German countryside

German Studies

Courses

Lower Division Courses

All lower division courses in German are taught in German unless otherwise stated.

Prerequisites: None. Not open to students who have completed three years of high school German unless the third course was completed five or more years ago.

German 100A is an elementary language course, which introduces students to essential vocabulary, basic grammar structures, and the articulation of German sounds. Students learn to identify and describe everyday objects and scenes, express likes and dislikes, report events in the present tense, remark on isolated events in the past, ask basic questions, and give simple instructions. They develop basic listening and reading comprehension skills and gain initial skills in writing short German texts on personal topics. Students will also be introduced to the everyday cultures of the German-speaking regions.

Texts: Netzwerk A1 textbook, ISBN: 978-3-12-606129-2 (Klett); Netzwerk A1 Intensivtrainer, ISBN 978-3-12-606138-4

Prerequisites: German 100A or 2 years of high school German. Not open to students who have completed four years of high school German unless the fourth course was completed five or more years ago.

German 100B expands upon the language and cultural competency acquired in 100A.

Texts: Netzwerk A2 textbook, ISBN 978-3-12-606998-4; Netzwerk A2 Intensivtrainer, ISBN 978-3-12-607000-3

 

Prerequisites: None.

Introduction to fundamental questions of identity and belonging in contemporary German culture; investigation of Germany's place within the European Union and cultural responses to the process of European integration. Taught in English. Counts toward GE Foundations C. Humanities

Texts: Alina Bronsky, Baba Dunja’s Last Love (novel, Europa Editions)

 

Prerequisites: German 100B or 3 years of high school German or equivalent.

Reading strategies and language structures which aid reading comprehension will be introduced and practiced. A variety of texts, both literary and expository, will be read. German 202 satisfies the CAL three-semester language requirement for graduation. May be taken concurrently with German 205A or 205B (both courses are prerequisites for upper division German classes).

Texts: Anna Pilaski et.al., Entdeckungsreise: Kursbuch zur Landeskunde, ISBN 978-3-12-606380-7

 

Prerequisites: German 100B or 3 years of high school German or equivalent. Not open to students who have completed five years of high school German unless the fifth year was completed five or more years ago.

Intermediate language skills, with emphasis on listening, speaking, and writing, are practiced in the context of the cultures of those countries in which German is spoken.

German 205A satisfies the CAL three-semester language requirement for graduation.

Texts: Netzwerk B1 textbook, ISBN: 978-3-12-605003-6 (Klett); Netzwerk B1 Intensivtrainer, ISBN 978-3-12-605009-8; Netzwerk Grammatik A1-B1, ISBN 978-3-12-605008-1

Prerequisites: German 205A or 4 years of high school German or equivalent. Not open to students who have completed five years of high school German unless the fifth year was completed five or more years ago.

Intermediate language skills, with emphasis on listening, speaking, and writing, are practiced in the context of the cultures of those countries in which German is spoken.

Texts: Netzwerk B1 textbook, ISBN: 978-3-12-605003-6 (Klett); Netzwerk B1 Intensivtrainer, ISBN 978-3-12-605009-8; Netzwerk Grammatik A1-B1, ISBN 978-3-12-605008-1

Selected topics. May be repeated with new content. See Class Schedule for specific content. Limit of nine units of any combination of 296, 496, 596 courses applicable to a bachelor’s degree

 

Upper Division Courses (Intended for Undergraduates)

All upper division courses in German are taught in German unless otherwise stated.

Prerequisites: German 202 and 205B. Not open to students who hold a degree from a secondary or post-secondary school in which the primary language of instruction is German.

Development of advanced proficiency in reading comprehension and oral communication. A novel and many short readings, both fiction and non-fiction, will explore topics of current cultural relevance. Students will take a midterm and final exam.

Texts: Eichmanns Maier, Deutschland im Zeitalter der Globalisierung (Yale UP, 2015); Brussig, Am kürzeren Ende der Sonnenallee (Fischer, 2001)

Prerequisites: German 202 and 205B. Not open to students who hold a degree from a secondary or post-secondary school in which the primary language of instruction is German.

This course is designed to provide students with strategies and opportunities for developing advanced-level writing skills in German. Students practice grammatical structures and stylistics and work on expanding productive vocabulary. Emphasis will be given to the following genres: resume, formal correspondence, critical review, and position paper. Discussions, short reading selections and audio-visual materials relating to contemporary Germany, Austria, and Switzerland will provide topics for writing.

Texts: Jamie Rankin, Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik, 6th ed. Cengage Learning, 2014 (ISBN 978-1305078840)

Three lectures and one hour of laboratory. Prerequisites: German 202 and 205B.

Sounds and intonation of German.

Prerequisites: Completion of the General Education requirement in Foundations of Learning II.C., Humanities required for non-majors.

German 320 examines issues of contemporary Germany– including identity, migration, diversity, dealing with Germany’s past and preparing for the future – while introducing and practicing methods of the critical analysis of film. Films in German with English subtitles.

Course is taught in English.

Texts:  David Bordwell et.al., Film Art, ISBN 978-1259534959

Prerequisite: German 300 or 301.

Society and institutions of German-speaking regions through spoken and written texts from the media. Emphasis on topics of importance for business, communications, and German area studies.

Prerequisites: German 202 and 205B

German 410 examines major historical, political, and cultural developments in German-speaking areas from the Middle Ages until 1871. Students will read and discuss literature, art, philosophy, and critical theory in the context of major cultural shifts, such as the Reformation, Romanticism, and the birth of the German nation. Texts to be examined include The Song of the Nibelungs, Goethe’s Faust, and poems by Heinrich Heine und Ludwig von Eichendorff. Students will take a midterm and final exam and write a research paper in German.    

Texts: Schulze, Germany: A New History (Harvard UP 1998); Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust I, bilingual edition (Bantam Classics 1988). Additional materials will be made available on Canvas.

 

Prerequisites: German 202 and 205B

This course takes an in-depth look at major historical, political, and cultural developments in German-speaking Europe from 1871 until today. We will read and discuss important works of literature, philosophy, and critical theory and consider them in light of broad developments, such as urbanization, the rise of mass culture, World War I and II, the 1968 student movement, German unification, and globalization. Writers to be examined include Wagner, Nietzsche, Remarque, Aichinger, Arendt, and Heym. Assignments include a midterm and final exam and reading responses.

Texts: Wolfgang Beutin, Deutsche Literaturgeschichte (8. Auflage, 2013), Erich Maria Remarque, Im Westen nichts Neues(KiWi, 2014). Additional materials on Canvas.

Prerequisites: German 202 and 205B

Artistic, intellectual, and cultural movements of the German-speaking regions, while building on advanced language skills. May be repeated with new title and content. Maximum credit six units.

Prerequisites: German 202 and 205B.

Key institutions in the German political system. Contemporary debates on culture, economics, environmental policy, identity, migration, and the welfare state. Germany’s contributions to the European Union and the world.

Prerequisites: Upper division standing in major and consent of instructor.

Practical work experience in a field related to German studies. Work done under joint direction of activity sponsor and instructor. Approved international internships may count towards international experience requirement for major.

See German adviser.

Prerequisite: German 300 (for literary topics) or 301 (for linguistics topics).

Selected topics. May be repeated with new content. See Class Schedule for specific content. Limit of nine units of any combination of 296, 496, 596 courses applicable to a bachelor’s degree 

Prerequisites: Fifteen units of upper division German with an average grade of B (3.0) or better and consent of department chair.

Individual study of a topic agreed upon by the student and a faculty member. Maximum credit of 6 units in 499 allowed. Students may not do a special study in lieu of a course, which is being offered this academic semester.

 

Upper Division Courses (Also Acceptable for Advanced Degrees)

Prerequisites: German 300 and 301.

Major authors and genres since Enlightenment.

Prerequisites: Two upper division German courses.

Directed research on topics in German studies. See Class Schedule for specific content. May be repeated with new title and content. Maximum credit six units.

Prerequisites: German 300 and 301. Proof of completion of prerequisites required: Copy of transcript.

Topics in German language, literature, or linguistics. May be repeated with new content. See Class Schedule for specific content. Limit of nine units of any combination of 296, 496, 596 courses applicable to a bachelor’s degree. Credit for 596 and 696 applicable to a master’s degree with approval of the graduate adviser.

 

 

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